Friday Feels: Vendors Put on Blast!

Friday Feels: Vendors Put on Blast!

It's been a little while since we've promoted our Super Anonymous, Super Secret Feedback Form, where wedding professionals can submit their rants and pet peeves about the vendors they're working with at weddings. (Feeling salty? Click on the button on the right sidebar and let us know all about it!)

We've loved hearing what's wrong with our industry, because we love giving our peers a forum for sharing their true thoughts and feelings. Sure, no names are mentioned, but sometimes just making a behavior public, and calling it out as unacceptable, is a very effective way of addressing a problematic situation.

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Problem Vendors, Part 4: Expanding Unethically

Problem Vendors, Part 4: Expanding Unethically

Whether it’s videography, floral design or entertainment, most wedding and event vendors have a primary category of services and products they offer to clients. Some specialize even further by specifying the style or type, such as "nautical vintage decor" or “farm to table cuisine." This helps clients to narrow down their choices when researching the myriad of vendors in their area. It also assures that you as the business owner are targeting - and attracting - your ideal clients.

As any owner of a business will attest, we are constantly trying to improve services, add products and generally enhance the client experience to ensure our continued relevance in the industry. One of the ways vendors can do this is by expanding into other categories that are similar or that add value to their existing offerings. As attractive as this expansion can seem from a financial standpoint, implementing it can be a tricky process: you want to maintain consistency with your brand and not unduly overburden your current business' workflow. Some categories are a natural fit, such as photography and videography or DJs and live music. When handled professionally, these types of partnerships allow a company to expand while adding convenience for the couple planning an event.

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Problem Vendors, Part 3: Wedding Show Shadiness (Bro, That's Not Your Booth)

Problem Vendors, Part 3: Wedding Show Shadiness (Bro, That's Not Your Booth)

I've been in the wedding business a long time - 18 years as of this writing - and have seen the wedding show concept change a lot over the years. (I prefer the gender-neutral "wedding show" over the more-common "bridal show," but that's what I'm referring to here.) It used to be that huge, convention center and arena shows, with dozens and dozens of exhibitors and hundreds, if not thousands, of engaged couples in attendance, were the norm. Later, more specialized, boutique-style shows with higher ticket prices and a greater emphasis on providing a unique, upscale experience became a thing. More and more venues have since embraced the marketing tool of hosting open houses, with catering samples and participation from a select group of their favorite wedding vendors. All three of these wedding show styles continue to exist, and most wedding vendors that I know participate in at least one of these functions each year as part of their marketing plan.

Now, I know a lot has been discussed in the wedding industry debating the effectiveness of these shows. This post isn't about that. It's about some questionable behavior about the vendors who do participate in the shows. More specifically, it's about the vendors who participate in them without paying. I've personally observed two categories of vendor shadiness at wedding shows.

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Problem Vendors, Part 2: Marketing While Working

Problem Vendors, Part 2: Marketing While Working

Wedding vendor behavior: sometimes it can be as bad (or worse) than client behavior, and it creates a major impact on colleagues, wedding guests, and the general perception of the wedding industry. Today on the blog, we're continuing our five-part series on problem vendors. Be sure to check back next Monday for our third installment!

It’s hard to put yourself in front of potential clients. Print ads are expensive, wedding shows require your time and promotional materials, networking is exhausting and search engine optimization has become an ever-changing science. You might be thinking, “Wait, I’m in front of hundreds of potential clients every weekend! What can I do to get their business?”

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Throwing Professionalism to the Wind: Worst Sales Tactic Ever (And Here's Why)

Throwing Professionalism to the Wind: Worst Sales Tactic Ever (And Here's Why)

In one of WeddingIQ's most popular posts (at least in terms of traffic), I wrote about a DJ who stole my website content and then treated me to a litany of insults when I called him on it. Of course, being a wee bit prone to tangential rants, I also felt compelled to explore the topics of misogyny in the wedding business, and how female entrepreneurs are viewed when they defend themselves and their property. (Thanks for the inspiration, thieving DJ!) Even with all of that said, though, this individual has thoughtfully provided even more fodder for our blog, as a quick perusal of his website reminded me how problematic it is when a so-called "wedding professional" turns his back on standard business practices, all to make a sale.

Of course, it's not just this guy - I've personally seen, or heard about, wedding vendors in all service categories who flaunt their unprofessional policies as though they actually benefit clients. Given that this one DJ is the one who got my wheels turning on this phenomenon, though, let me give him his true moment in the spotlight, and address three specific things he does that I believe are harmful to his clients and to the industry.

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